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Adam Parrott

Adam Parrott Owner Katana Clothing & MMA Writer

Adam runs Katana Clothing when he's not reporting on things of a MMA nature we first bumped into him online on facebook and then finally in person at FURY MMA 5 at the Coronet Theatre in London. As luck would have it we were asked to film a few fights which left Dan on The stills and no one doing the fight review. Adam stepped up to the plate saving the day and allowing us to use his. We Invited Adam to answer a few question and this is what he had to sayJon P Adam Parrott And Dan Towers 
 
Hi Adam thanks for taking time out to do this for us

Q/ How did you first get into MMA?
 
A/As a kid growing up I was always obsessed with Bruce Lee. To me, Bruce Lee was the epitome of cool, and he was the human form of a superhero and I was just blown away by the way he would leap through the air and take out a room full of would be assassins without hardly breaking a sweat. Then the Karate Kid came out and the Jean Claude Van Damme era was just taking off – martial arts were really popular around this time in the late 80s, so I dabbled in various styles: Kung Fu, Karate and Judo. Fast forward several years and I was just getting back into Karate and trying Kickboxing and I see some YouTube footage of the UFC and discovered this whole new world of ground fighting, submissions and chokes. A week later I joined a Jiu-Jitsu class and literally fell in love with it. 
 
Katana ClothingQ/ When did you come up with the Katana Brand? 

A/ I went to New York on holiday a few years back and was really looking forward to getting my hands on some cheap MMA threads and saving a fortune on shipping costs. The reality was that the clothes were awful – everything had skulls, crossbones, wings, flames and garish over-sized prints on them. I was disappointed. I wanted to be able to represent the sport I loved, but I didn’t want to wear something that looked so demonic and gothic. To me martial arts have always been about discipline, respect and honour, and these designs didn’t embody that at all. I felt frustrated and when I got back to the UK I scoured the internet for something that represented the integrity and nobility of martial arts – there wasn’t anything. And I decided there and then, that I wanted to start my own brand, a brand that wouldn’t just over-kill a t-shirt with an in-your-face logo for the sake of it, and a brand that put thought into their design process and kept things clean and simple. 
 
Q/ We spoke about how much time and money goes into the work when we met at Fury MMA. Tell us how much time a week, you would spend working and how hard was it starting from scratch?
 
A/ Pretty much every waking moment! I am literally obsessed with MMA. Katana is really a two-pronged business where on one side you’ve got the clothing and on the other side there is the blog. Every day I wake up and the first thing I do is check out all my favourite MMA websites to see what’s going on in the world. And I start to think about what I want to blog about that day. I always look for something that I find entertaining, informative or inspirational. I don’t consider myself an MMA news website, but more like a voice of MMA. The blog is an extension of the Katana brand.
 Adam Parrott
On the clothing side of things, I will check my own website first thing, ship out orders, respond to emails, make phone calls and work on some future designs if I get time. I always have ideas suddenly pop into my head, so I carry a notebook with me and jot everything down. 
 
Weekends, more often than not I’m covering an event in or around the London area. If not then I’m staying up half the night watching the UFC, Bellator or Strikeforce. And if I ever decide to take a few hours off from it all in the evening, I will probably end up watching a DVD of the early years of the UFC or Pride. Failing that, I might be found at a Jiu-Jitsu class collecting some new bruises!
 
It’s always hard building a brand up from scratch, but I am extremely passionate about Katana, so it makes things more bearable. I haven’t taken investments. I don’t want Katana to be some huge soul-less corporation. It’s not about seeing how big Katana can get and how quickly. I’m in this for the long-haul, and if I have to build Katana up brick-by-brick, then I’m happy with that.
 
Q/ You have done some great interviews. What one stands out the most and why?
 
A/ I can’t single one out as my best because I’ve literally enjoyed every interview I’ve done. And I always come away feeling like I’ve learnt so much more about the person I’ve just interviewed. Paul Daley was great to interview, the guy lives, sleeps and breathes martial arts. Just a few minutes in his company and you can see just how passionate he is. He’s a very humble and respectful man too – a true martial artist. Adam Parrott
 
Luke Barnatt is an interviewer’s dream. He’s almost like the UK’s very own version of Chael Sonnen – he says exactly what’s on his mind and doesn’t pull any punches with his answers. I recently interviewed Jack Mason and was blown away by how professional and intelligent the guy is. With the stigma that still surrounds the sport of mixed martial arts, it’s important, I think, for people like Jack to be representing the sport and showing that this isn’t a sport for thugs and bullies that just want to be hurt people. 
 
Nick Chapman is the same, he’s a man mountain, covered in tattoos, looks mean, but he is an extremely intelligent person and reflects all what is good is the world of mixed martial arts. He’ll openly admit that the sport helped him turn his life around, and now he’s doing the same for others with his Fight Science gym. I found it very inspirational interviewing Nick.
 
I know that my best interviews are yet to come. That’s what drives me on. I want each interview to be better than the last one. 
  
Q/ In your opinion what is the biggest MMA promotion in the UK?
 
A/ Without question, I would have to say Luke Barnatt. Luke is a mixed martial artist; he’s not a “Cage Fighter.” And I believe there is a huge difference. Luke surrounds himself with people that are better than him. He’s learning from some of the best martial artist in the country right now. He’s hungry to learn and very motivated. He’s very ambitions and knows exactly where he wants to go in this sport. He trains hard, literally lives in the gym, eats sensibly and feeds his mind with mental protein. Every time he fights, he’s visibly better than his last performance. The only thing that stands in the way of Luke reaching his full potential is himself, and he knows this, and that makes him a very intelligent mixed martial artist in my book.
 
Q/ What does the future hold for Katana, any plans?

A/ Wow, great question – and in a nutshell, lots. At the moment it’s all about creating brand awareness and making more people aware of Katana. The thing that sets Katana apart from most other brands is that our products are only exclusive through our website. You won’t find Katana in any stores or sold through any outlets. By doing this we control the customer experience and it makes Katana more personal. I’m working on some great designs at the moment that I hope to launch soon. They will be limited edition, so first come first served. I don’t like seeing a T-shirt I’ve just bought being worn by hundreds of people on the High Street – and I’m sure the majority of people feel that way too. You want to feel unique and special when you pull that T-shirt on in the morning.

There are some other things in the pipeline too, that are a bit further off at the moment, so I can’t say too much. But it will be awesome, I promise.

On the blog side of things, I will be covering as many shows as I can, interviewing more martial artists and trying to spread the good word of this sport that we all love, especially in the UK where the sport is literally growing more popular by the week. It really is an amazing scene to be involved in right now.Well thanks for taking time out and all the best with Katana Clothing
 

Feature Written Approx 23rd July 2012